Furby Language

Furby Language

Furbish – This is the language spoken by all Furbys and Friends of Furby. Furbish takes inspiration from many languages, especially Japanese and German. The original 1998 Furby and it’s dictionary contained a total of 42 different furbish words. Over the years of furby models many new words have been invented from Moo-Lah (Money) To Oo-Kah (Uncle). When you first get a Furby, they will speak mainly Furbish and be quite difficult to understand, but as your Furby develops, they will speak more English and less Furbish. When fully developed, Furbys will speak roughly 80% English and 20% Furbish. Though some Furbys sold in non-English-speaking countries don’t speak English at all – there are Spanish-speaking, Japanese-Speaking, German-speaking, French-speaking and Italian-speaking Furbys to be found!

Furby Language

Overview

Furbish is a mix of different sounds and simple syllables to form a basic language. Athough furbish may seem primative and silly at first, it combines many aspects of real languages from around the world. An example would be the furbish phrase “Doo?”. Instead of putting a question mark at the end of a sentence, “Doo?” is used. This is very similar to the japanese word “Desu Ka?” Which is used in place of a question mark. The furby language can be found in the furby dictionary.

An Owners Furby Language Experience

“Have you ever seen or owned a Furby? This was a popular toy about 15 years ago which “talked” when stimulated through touch, motion, light, or sound. I was given a “Baby Furby” by the daughter of a friend and enjoyed her (she was pink so, I guess, a girl) very much! What was so cool about these toys was the way they developed more language with increased stimulation. Just switching the “on” button produced a greeting. She was a “baby” so, of course, used a lot of immature jargon and short phrases like, “Me hungry” and “Feed the baby!” If you then touched her beak (yes, sort of a baby pink chicken face), it stimulated a response phrase like, “Mmmmm, good!” or “Yummy to the tummy!” It was fun seeing what kind of stimulation made the Furby talk about various topics. For example, shaking her around in the air led to the complaint that she was scared or that her stomach hurt, and covering her eye hole (in the forehead) made her complain about the dark. (Lots of complaints, now that I think about it.)

I quickly realized that the way Furby was acquiring language was VERY MUCH like a real baby or toddler: the more stimulation you provided, the more words and phrases came out. New and varied slogans also popped out, but only after extended sessions of interaction. Well? How is this different from human children? I loved it! I started taking Furby on the road to various trainings and conferences when language acquisition was my topic. I used her to demonstrate how early stimulation leads to enlarged vocabularies in babies and toddlers. She made an interesting and cooperative model who required no “care” other than an occasional new battery. Then a really weird thing happened. I had a 2-1/2 day training in Sacramento (a 7 to 8 hour drive from my home) and packed up the car to go. I put the bulk of my training materials in the trunk, but belted Furby into the front seat. To be sure she didn’t yak the whole way, I shut her off and took out the battery. She was quiet all day – for a change. Because I will tell you that the motion of the car would definitely have made her chat away otherwise.

I used Furby for the portion of the training focused on language. They loved it, as usual. The end was finally in sight after a looooong training jaunt, and I was raring to drive home even though noon was approaching. So, I offered hasty goodbyes, raced out of the building and threw everything, including Furby (switched off, but with the battery still inside), in the trunk. I drove home with the radio on and never really gave Furby a second thought. BUT… when I arrived home and opened the trunk, she was blabbering away and using a new vocabulary which included, for the first time, the word “sick” – YES! New words and phrases had popped out while she bumped around in the dark trunk for 7 hours. She was complaining incessantly that she was “hot” and was crying, saying, “Baby sick!” It was awful! I had to disconnect her battery for days to get her to stop crying and complaining. In the end, she never went on the road with me again.”

Furby Language Examples

Ay-ay ………………………. Look/See
Ah-may ……………………. Pet
A-loh ……………………….. Light
Aloh / may-lah …………… Cloud
A-tay ……………………….. Hungrey/Eat
Boh-bay …………………… Worried
Boo …………………………. No
Dah …………………………. Big
Doo? ……………………….. What?
Doo-ay …………………….. Fun
Doo-moh ………………….. Please feed me
E-day ………………………. Good
Kah …………………………. Me
Kkoh-koh …………………. Again
Koo-dye …………………… Health
Kah/boo/koo-doh ………. I’m not healthy
Lee-koo …………………… Sound
Loo-loo ……………………. Joke
May-may ………………….. Love
May-lah ……………………. Hug
May-tah ……………………. Kiss
Mee-mee ………………….. Very
Nah-Bah …………………… Down
Nee-tye ……………………. Tickle
Noh-lah ……………………. Dance
Noo-loo ……………………. Happy
O-kay ………………………. OK
Toh-dye ……………………. Done
Toh-loo …………………….. Like
U-nye ……………………….. You
U-tye ………………………… Up
Wah! ………………………… Yipeee!!
Way-loh …………………….. Sleep
Wee-tee ……………………. Sing

Furbish-English phrases

Furbish is the Furbies’ language, with simple syllables, short words, and various sounds. A newly purchased Furby starts out speaking entirely Furbish. Over time, the Furby gradually replaces Furbish words and phrases with English.

wee-tah-kah-loo-loo: Tell me a joke.
wee-tah-kah-wee-loo: Tell me a story.
wee-tee-kah-wah-tee: Sing me a song.
u-nye-loo-lay-doo?: Do you want to play?
u-nye-ay-tay-doo?: Are you hungry?
u-nye-boh-doo?: How are you?
u-nye-way-loh-nee-way: Go to sleep now.
u-nye-noh-lah: Show me a dance.

Furbies may say these Furbish words:

doo?: What? (Furbies say this when called)
doo-dah: Yes. (Furbies say this in response to a command before doing it.)
boo: No. (Furbies say this when they do not want to carry out a command.)
yoo?: Why will you not play with me today? (This usually means the Furby is upset.)